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Tuesday, June 25, 2024

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Opponents of latest AR state tax cuts say they benefit wealthy Arkansans; Julian Assange agrees to a plea deal that would allow him to avoid imprisonment in US; Tech-based carbon-capture projects make headway in local government; NV nonprofit calls Biden's student debt initiatives economic justice.

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Charges against fake electors in Nevada are dismissed, Milwaukee officials get ready to expect the unexpected at the RNC convention, and the Justice Department says Alaska is violating the Americans with Disabilities Act.

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A Minnesota town claims the oldest rural Pride Festival while rural educators say they need support to teach kids social issues, rural businesses can suffer when dollar stores come to town and prairie states like South Dakota are getting help to protect grasslands.

Cultural Resources

More than 30 tribal nations are represented at the University of South Dakota, according to the institution. (Wikimedia Commons)

Tuesday, June 25, 2024

USD threats to fire staff part of larger trend

The University of South Dakota threatened to fire staff members in what some see as an ongoing attack on academic freedom, according to reporting in …

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Of the 17 states that have enacted music therapy legislation, 11 have placed the law in its own statute chapter, and others have grouped it with other forms of therapy. (Adobe Stock)<br />

Tuesday, June 25, 2024

Group aims to get music therapy licensure in Wyoming

Advocates in Wyoming trying to get music therapy licensure recognized in the state are hitting roadblocks. Members of the Wyoming Music Therapy …

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Groups call for new citizens to have greater access to federal lands, waters

June is National Immigrant Heritage Month, and advocates in Utah want to see a pathway to U.S. citizenship include easier access to public lands and …

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The U.S. government recognized the Black Hills as part of the Great Sioux Reservation in the 1868 Treaty of Fort Laramie. The Black Hills Forest Reserve was established in 1897 and transferred to the U.S. Forest Service in 1905. (R. Blauert, Wikimedia Commons)
Black Hills Visitor Center under new joint tribal, federal oversight

The Black Hills National Forest is one of the latest federal lands to enter a co-stewardship agreement with local tribal nations-a management model en…

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The Indiana Department of Natural Resources says ground within 100 feet of a burial ground may not be disturbed for erecting, altering or repairing any structure that would impact the location without approval from the Division of Historic Preservation and Archaeology. (Adobe Stock)
Juneteenth honors freedom amid possible IN graveyard extinction

Today is Juneteenth, the federal holiday recognizing this date in 1865 when slaves in Texas were told they were free, more than two years after the …

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Around 67% of LGBTQ+ people reported needing a mental health service over the past two years, compared with 39% of non-LGBTQ+ people, according to KFF. (Chris Allan/Adobe Stock)
WY theater company talks health care on stage

As Pride Month winds down, health advocates want members of the LGBTQ+ community to know about health care options, despite any challenges to …

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Environmental groups are working to attract more Latino families to enjoy the great outdoors on public lands such as the Alabama Hills National Scenic Area in southern Inyo County. (Louis Medina)
Latino environmental groups push for greater access to public lands

Conservation groups are circulating a petition asking the feds to give "America the Beautiful National Parks and Recreation Lands" passes to new citiz…

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A new Colorado law provides local and tribal governments with science-based resources for siting and permitting new renewable-energy projects, including maps identifying sensitive wildlife habitat. (Adobe Stock)
New resources available to site CO clean-energy projects, protect wildlife

To reach 100% clean energy by 2040 - a move seen as critical for averting the worst impacts of climate change - Colorado must generate five times more…

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Ohio artist Kenia Lamarr created a mural for the rusty-patched bumblebee, the first native bee on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's endangered species list. (Kenia Lamarr)
Pollinator festival, mural highlight rusty-patched bumblebee in Ohio

An upcoming festival in Columbus, Ohio, aims to raise awareness about the plight of pollinators and ongoing conservation efforts. According to the U.…

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The group says the United States should work with partner countries willing and able to enforce strict terms or face sanctions. (Anastasiia/Adobe Stock)
Environmental groups want say in Critical Mineral Agreements

A group of environmental and civil society organizations is fighting for better working conditions for people in countries that supply critical minera…

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According to a MarketWatch report, during the pandemic, unused credit lines posed a major risk to banks. To manage this risk, many banks reduced people's credit limits if they thought a cardholder's ability to repay might be at risk. (eliosdnepr/Adobe Stock)
Credit limit cuts signal financial woes for some Ohioans

In an analysis of 100 cities across the United States, Cincinnati ranks 22nd for decreasing credit limits - not for the city itself, but for its …

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According to a MarketWatch report, during the pandemic, unused credit lines posed a major risk to banks. To manage this risk, many banks reduced people's credit limits if they thought a cardholder's ability to repay might be at risk. (eliosdnepr/Adobe Stock)
Some MO credit-card users see shifts in credit limits

Missouri's two major metro areas are part of a WalletHub analysis of credit-limit decreases among 100 U.S. cities. The WalletHub research looks at …

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