skip to main content
skip to newscasts

Monday, July 15, 2024

Public News Service Logo
facebook instagram linkedin reddit youtube twitter
view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

NBC News reports the Rooftop where the gunman shot at Trump was identified as a security vulnerability; Judge Cannon dismisses Classified Documents Case against Trump; UTA professors refuse to comply with Title IX of abortion law; smaller ranchers voice concerns about USDA electronic tag mandates.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

Former President Trump is injured but safe after an attempted assassination many condemn political violence. Democrats' fears intensify over Biden's run. And North Carolina could require proof of citizenship to vote.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

Enticing remote workers to move is a new business strategy in rural America, Eastern Kentucky preservationists want to save the 20th century home of a trailblazing coal miner, and a rule change could help small meat and poultry growers and consumers.

Poll on climate change shows some in ND yet to be convinced

play audio
Play

Friday, February 23, 2024   

North Dakota voters are divided on climate change matters, according to new polling data. To get more community buy-in for climate solutions, a University of North Dakota professor says, local leaders can fine-tune their messaging.

In the North Dakota News Cooperative survey, 43% of eligible voters in the state believe climate change "threatens their future way of life." And there are wide gaps along political lines, with 87% of Democrats and only 26% of Republicans expressing concern.

As local governments work on those issues, said Rebecca Romsdahl, a professor of earth system science and policy at UND who has studied climate-change impacts, some find it's an uphill battle in connecting with residents.

"A lot of people still see these issues as something that affects other people in other places," she said, "and that maybe it's a future problem, but maybe it doesn't affect my life today."

She said elected officials can convey the importance of updating infrastructure to avoid long-term damage costs from climate disasters. Using government incentives for adopting clean-energy technology is another suggestion.

Only 26% of poll respondents said they believe climate change is "mainly caused by human activity."

Despite increasing signs of climate change affecting North Dakota, such as periods of drought, Romsdahl said it'll likely take a little longer for people to be fully convinced the threats have reached their doorstep.

"It is challenging because we live in the center of the continent here," she said, "so we are used to having kind of extreme weather - whether it's hot summers and cold winters."

However, she said, having more unusually warm winters such as the one hitting the region right now might turn more heads. Romsdahl said establishing renewable-energy cooperatives could be another effective approach. Residents can have an ownership stake in these efforts, while also creating new revenue streams for the community and not an outside utility.


get more stories like this via email

more stories
"I truly love our Country, and love you all, and look forward to speaking to our Great Nation this week from Wisconsin," wrote Former President Donald Trump on social media. (Gage Skidmore/Flickr)

Social Issues

play sound

Gov. Spencer Cox is calling for unity as well as the condemnation of political violence in light of the assassination attempt on former President …


Environment

play sound

Last week, the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee heard testimony on the state and federal response to the collapse of the Key Bridge…

Environment

play sound

Forecasters are warning New Englanders to prepare for an "above-normal" number of hurricanes this summer. Hurricane Beryl was already the strongest …


Social Issues

play sound

A coalition of South Dakota groups is voicing its opposition to a ballot measure intended to end a state sales tax on consumables. If passed this …

According to a 2022 Kids Count report, 20 North Dakota counties meet less than 60% of the child care demand in their counties. (Adobe Stock)

Social Issues

play sound

North Dakota officials will highlight a new project today to boost childcare access for parents with nontraditional work hours. A local provider …

Social Issues

play sound

With just over a month before Indiana university students return, a new law affecting college professor tenures is in full effect. The law targets …

Social Issues

play sound

Half of Nevada voters feel their political leaders are ignoring the housing crisis. Recent polling conducted by the Center for Popular Democracy and …

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member- and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright 2021